08.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

08.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

01.10.2021

Walrus From Space

Gaze down at the Arctic and see walrus, from space!

Join scientists from Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) to discuss the Walrus From Space project and learn how YOU can help them better understand the impacts of the climate crisis on walrus.

The climate crisis has put the Arctic in meltdown, with this polar region warming almost three times faster than the rest of the world. The sea ice walrus depend on is melting beneath them and we need to know more about how their populations are impacted.

WWF and BAS are asking the public to become ‘Walrus Detectives’ and help contribute to conservation science by searching for walrus in the thousands of satellite images taken from space. Over the next 5 years the project aims to carry out the first ever census of the Atlantic and Laptev walrus population using satellite imagery and explore what might happen to walrus in the context of rapid climate change. This will help scientists to better understand the impact of climate change on populations of this iconic species and help safeguard their future.

Our collective actions add up to something powerful, and we want you to be some of the first of the 500,000 people we hope to take part in this project as ‘citizen scientists’ over the next 5 years.

The sessions will begin with a presentation from one or more of the scientists leading the project, displaying imagery of walrus in the Arctic. Followed by a Q&A with the scientists and the opportunity to take part in the project and become a walrus scientist yourself!

30.09.2021

Climate Science at the top of the world – National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Expeditions

This session brings together science, exploration and storytelling to highlight the impact of climate change on mountain systems and glaciers – and the people who depend on them for water. We will start with a screening of Expedition Everest, the documentary that highlights the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition where dozens of scientists converge to investigate what secrets the world’s highest peak has to tell us about our changing climate. The notorious Khumbu Glacier is mapped in stunning detail, biologists study extreme lifeforms, and a team of Sherpas and climate scientists climb straight towards the “death zone” to install the highest weather station in the world.

The screening will be followed by an interview with Dr Tom Matthews, one of the scientists from the Everest Expedition.

The discussion will focus on: Why conducting science in the most extreme environments is important in understanding our changing world. What is happening at the roof of the world and critical, but vulnerable, “water towers”. How are local communities devising solutions to the impacts of climate change.

Dr Claire McNulty, the Europe lead for the National Geographic Society, will host the session and open the floor to audience questions.

30.09.2021

ClimateScience Olympiad 21 award ceremony with Jane Goodall | $10,000 prize for young climate solvers

Over 12,000 brilliant youth from all continents took part in the 2021 ClimateScience Olympiad to find solutions to climate change. Today, along with exciting keynotes from Dr. Jane Goodall and Dr. Renate Christ (fmr. Director of the IPCC), the three winning teams will be announced and receive their share of ClimateScience’s $10,000 prize pool.

ClimateScience (www.ClimateScience.org) is a global charity providing educational resources on solutions to climate change to millions of people worldwide via children’s books, teaching resources for schools, competitions like the ClimateScience Olympiad (https://climatescience.org/olympiad/), social media (https://www.instagram.com/climate_science/) , and animated videos on TV. All this is possible thanks to our incredible team of over 1,000 volunteers in over 30 countries.

30.09.2021

Here We Are: Notes For Living on Planet Earth with Oliver Jeffers

Join artist and author Oliver Jeffers for a screening of the Apple Original film “Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth,” available
on Apple TV+.

After the film, Jeffers will lead families in an interactive discussion about Earth, in celebration of the place we call home.

Film Synopsis: On the eve of Earth Day, a precocious seven-year-old learns about the wonders of the planet from his parents- and a
mysterious exhibit at the aptly named Museum of Everything. Based on the best-selling children’s book by Oliver Jeffers.

30.09.2021

Hydro: Powering a Net Zero Future

SSE will premiere Hydro: Powering a Net Zero Future, a film celebrating the rich heritage of hydro power and looking ahead to its vital role in combating climate change. The film will look at the transformative social and economic impact hydro power had on the north of Scotland following WW2, the continued role it plays and the potential for this almost 80-year-old technology to support a decarbonised electricity grid.  Following the film’s premiere there will be a panel event with UK and international experts discussing hydro’s role in reducing carbon emissions.

30.09.2021

Generation Earthshot : Discover What It Takes To Win An Earthshot Prize

What does it take to win a £1m Earthshot Prize? Where
do ideas come from and how can you come up with
solutions to repair the planet?

All these questions and
more will be explored in an interactive event for school
students (aged 10-14) to meet and find out more about
some of the 2021 Earthshot Prize Finalists.

The Finalists will be interviewed by representatives of
“Generation Earthshot” – young climate champions.
They will also explore why learning should always be the
first step to action and share their own tips for getting
involved in the climate and environment movement.

This event will mix live and digital participation through
panels, interviews, teaching and film.

30.09.2021

A Beautiful Planet

The Award-winning IMAX film, A Beautiful Planet is a breath-taking portrait of Earth from space, providing a unique perspective and increased understanding of our planet and galaxy as never seen before. Made in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the film features stunning footage of our magnificent blue planet — and the effects humanity has had on it over time — captured by the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Narrated by Jennifer Lawrence, produced by IMAX Entertainment and Toni Myers — the acclaimed Canadian filmmaker behind celebrated IMAX® documentaries Blue Planet, Hubble 3D, and Space Station 3D.

Presented by the Global Climate Uprising Festival, the film contains warnings regarding climate change and environmental degradation using IMAX footage of Earth from space and time-lapse photography. While showing the impact of Earth’s warming climate, the film also offers positive reasons to take better care of our planet to depict how Earth’s warming climate is causing global disasters and how we are finding solutions in research from deep space to lunar explorations on the bottom of the ocean floor.

IMAX veteran Jackson Myers, son of the film’s director, the late Toni Myers, will join us for a post screening discussion and Q&A. Captain Samantha Cristoforetti, European Space Agency Astronaut has been invited to address the audience. Captain Cristoforetti holds the record for the longest uninterrupted spaceflight by a European and is the first Italian woman in space.

30.09.2021

Be part of the solution: How research and innovation is tackling climate change

Talented people with bright ideas in the UK’s research and innovation system are coming together to drive a new green industrial revolution. This revolution is powered by collective expertise and the determination to achieve net zero carbon emissions, live more sustainably and ultimately tackle climate change.

The UK’s scientists, researchers and innovators, supported by UKRI investment, are creating new and exciting solutions to complex climate challenges. As well as technical solutions, their work provides robust, rigorous evidence to inform climate policy.

Did you know that hydrogen could power a plane, or that robots are inspecting wind turbines? Join us to discover how ideas are becoming reality to offer a more sustainable and certain future for us all.
In our 90-minute session, you’ll hear from scientists and innovators themselves.

  • Understand the role of science in identifying and understanding climate change and its impacts
  • Explore the latest in renewable energy, from the role of hydrogen to lighter wind turbine blades
  • We’ll be busting some of the myths around electric vehicles as well as considering flight and maritime innovation in our session on travel and transport
  • We will explore whether we will all be eating insects in the future
  • In food and packaging; will we all be eating insects in the future and how do we solve the problem of plastic?
  • Showcasing the diversity of talent including the work of women and young innovators and leaving you with some great ideas about how you can help to tackle climate change

Imagine a net zero world in 2050 world of possible solutions in our interactive and lively session. You will leave us knowing how to contribute to a brighter future by making everyday changes which help tackle climate change and its impact on our planet and people.