01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

30.09.2021

Construction: The Built Environment

Construction: The Built Environment and Construction Sector accounts for 38% of global Carbon Emissions: Come and learn how the Construction Leadership Council’s Construct Zero industry-change programme is targeting the most impactful actions to mitigate this, leading the industry’s charge to meeting the Prime Minister’s 2035 Net Zero target.

The event will be co-chaired by a leading Government Minister and a young professional from the construction industry and feature Andrew Griffith MP (PM’s Net Zero Champion).

Are you a policy maker or Government figure who wants to maximise your impact in reaching Net Zero? Our analysis will cut through the hype to define the areas across the Built Environment where policy and legislative change can really make a difference.

Are you a business, wanting to become Net Zero but need to understand the benefits and how to go about doing so? Our Business Champions, drawn from across the sector will tell their story and show you how.

Are you a young professional and want to play your part? Your voice is crucial to delivering Net Zero- we will discuss why young people should care; what are the key platforms to engage them and how; and what does the future of the construction sector look like.

As industry leaders, your role in shaping and developing the approach is vital. The workshop will conclude with a panel discussion featuring prominent CEO’s discussing:

– the global challenges of delivering Net Zero in the Built Environment
– the combined power of industry and Government in delivering Net Zero
– how the future of the construction sector will pivot to meet the challenge

30.09.2021

Climate Crisis Film Festival – Award Ceremony & Scottish Première of the film “Above Water”

The Climate Crisis Film Festival, presented by Doconomy, concludes two weeks of climate films and special events with an Award Ceremony and Special Film Screening, celebrating underrepresented voices within the climate movement. This evening’s program will showcase stunning, diverse and eye-opening cinema from BIPOC filmmakers (black, indigenous and people of colour), popping the “Western bubble” with authentic perspectives from around the globe. OCEAN BOTTLE FILM AWARD We’ll announce the winner of the £6,000 Ocean Bottle Film Award, the first-ever Award program for climate films open exclusively to underrepresented BIPOC filmmakers. The four Nominees represent powerful climate stories from the Phillippines, Mexico, Nicaragua and Indigenous Hawaii. SCOTTISH PREMIERE – “Above Water” by Aïssa Maïga

The Award Ceremony will be followed by the screening of “Above Water” (Marcher Sur L’Eau, 2021), introduced virtually by the director, Senegal-born Aïssa Maïga. This breathtakingly photographed portrait of a young girl’s life in Niger, as water becomes scarcer and scarcer, will be presented in partnership with Goethe Institut, Alliance Française and Institut Français.

30.09.2021

Advertising A Good Life in 2030

What does A Good Life in 2030 look and feel like?

SUMMARY
Join us for the premiere of A Good Life 2030, a documentary exploring the link between advertising, consumption and climate change together with new
adverts for 2030 created by top advertising agencies. Hear talks from the Co-Founders of Purpose Disruptors exploring the tensions people in advertising feel at this moment and the role they can play in creating new visions of the future. Ones that we can move towards together, today.

DOCUMENTARY: A Good Life 2030
The documentary will show how people in the advertising industry who are the architects of desire can create desire for something different, a new ‘Good Life’.

See how new research by the Insight Climate Collective reveals how UK citizens have a clear vision of A Good Life in 2030 – they dream of a life filled with
connection not just consumption. Understand the shifts people in the industry think are necessary in response to this, drawn from imagination workshops with over 100 industry leaders – some of whom are featured in the documentary. Finally, see behind the scenes as top advertising agencies sprint to create ‘ads for 2030’ in response to the citizens’ visions.

ADVERTS for 2030
Be the first to see the new ‘adverts’ for 2030 that create compelling visions of the future, made for COP26 and screened here for the first time.

TALKS from Purpose Disruptors
The films will be accompanied by talks from Lisa Merrick-Lawless and Jonathan Wise, co-founders of Purpose Disruptors and ex-industry leaders. They will
share how their work is helping facilitate the change at the heart of the advertising industry and how this change is being led from within by a community of over 1,700 change agents.

goodlife2030.earth

#goodlife2030

30.09.2021

Creating youth-led solutions: Sharing stories and insight with YMCA, film premiere and panel

Join one of the world’s largest youth organisations, YMCA, as it premieres its short film, commissioned exclusively for COP26, documenting the story of how young leaders on each continent are innovating local solutions to the climate crisis.

In 2019, YMCA launched the Youth-Led Solutions initiative, to mentor, train and support the development of young people’s solutions to issues of climate justice, employment and mental health.

In 2020, YMCA held its first Summit on climate action, subsequently funding 35 new youth-led initiatives around the world. This film premiere will highlight just some of their projects, the journey so far, and the work that young people are doing to be ambassadors for social change. Hear from young people installing vermicomposting and tackling electronic waste in Hawaii; see their work in Peru where addressing poor sanitisation and inorganic waste has led to addressing income inequity; witness a cross-cultural collaboration between young people in Albay, Philippines and Michigan, USA to train a new generation of eco-leaders; learn about community-led reforestation in the Western Balkan forests of Kosovo; watch as young people create micro-green spaces across Ramallah, Palestine; and discover how curriculum-based climate art projects are utilising up-cycled waste in schools in Zambia.

A panel discussion will follow the premiere featuring young leaders and guests from around the world. For more than 175 years, YMCA has convened young people in every corner of the world, today working with more than 60 million people, in 120 countries. In more recent years, young leaders have been working alongside YMCA, harnessing its global impact, to mobilise solutions to inequalities and injustices in communities everywhere.

30.09.2021

Fix the economy to fix climate change: the role of the circular economy

We cannot fix climate change unless we transform the whole economy. The circular economy is a key part of the solution to tackle climate change and to fulfil the objectives set out in the Paris Agreement.

In this session we will:

  • Explore how businesses can integrate the circular economy into their overall strategy and specifically their climate strategies, and showcase leading examples of this in practice.
  • Hear directly from leaders in the food and mobility sectors about how to pilot and scale up circular economy activities and stimulate cross value-
    chain collaboration.
  • Connect these examples and experiences with opportunities for policymakers to accelerate the circular economy transition through policies and investment.

30.09.2021

Building new coalitions to win the race to zero emissions by 2050!

Academy Award winning film producer Dirk Wilutzky (CITIZENFOUR, 2014) will discuss a series of short films that are planned as part of the "Transformative Urban Coalitions (TUC)“ project, which strives to achieve socially inclusive, fast and radical CO2-emissions reductions in five selected pilot cities in Argentina, Mexico and Brazil. Excerpts from the work in progress will be screened, followed by a conversation involving the audience with Dirk Wilutzky, Dr. Simone Sandholz, Senior Urban Expert of the United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS), Adriana Lobo, Executive Director, World Resource Institute (WRI) in Mexico, and Kaime Silvestre, an indigenous youth activist from Brazil.

Together they will discuss how filmmakers and artists can cooperate with scientists to reach, inform and inspire people across different communities to engage in concrete action towards drastically curbing carbon emissions right now.

The speakers and the audience will explore together how climate science and action on the ground can be shared through film and art to engage people worldwide, and how film and art can help to shift mindsets and inspire people from all walks of life to become part of a movement towards zero emissions.

The goal of the session is to start a broader conversation on the importance of building new coalitions in the face of the climate emergency, involving nontraditional actors, such as filmmakers and artists, to make a difference in the race towards zero emissions.

The Transformative Urban Coalitions project is a joint collaboration between the United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS), the World Resources Institute (WRI), the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), and the German Development Institute (DIE-GDI) and is funded under the International Climate Initiative (IKI) of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU).

30.09.2021

Talking about Our Generation: putting younger generations in charge of the switch to sustainable energy & transportation

Following a film premiere with Fully Charged and National Grid where young people document their hopes, dreams and fears for climate change, we invite you to join a riveting panel, with TV presenter Robert Llewellyn speaking to youngsters as we put them in charge of the switch to sustainable energy and transportation.

Hear their thoughts on:

  • Whether we are making progress fast enough
  • Where they want to see focused efforts when it comes to cleaning up transport
  • What they want those in charge now to do to protect their future.

This won’t be your ordinary panel talking to experts – we will be flipping things around so future generations have their say on what shape the world should take when it comes to energy supply and driving the future of transport.

30.09.2021

Climate Science at the top of the world – National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Expeditions

This session brings together science, exploration and storytelling to highlight the impact of climate change on mountain systems and glaciers – and the people who depend on them for water. We will start with a screening of Expedition Everest, the documentary that highlights the 2019 National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition where dozens of scientists converge to investigate what secrets the world’s highest peak has to tell us about our changing climate. The notorious Khumbu Glacier is mapped in stunning detail, biologists study extreme lifeforms, and a team of Sherpas and climate scientists climb straight towards the “death zone” to install the highest weather station in the world.

The screening will be followed by an interview with Dr Tom Matthews, one of the scientists from the Everest Expedition.

The discussion will focus on: Why conducting science in the most extreme environments is important in understanding our changing world. What is happening at the roof of the world and critical, but vulnerable, “water towers”. How are local communities devising solutions to the impacts of climate change.

Dr Claire McNulty, the Europe lead for the National Geographic Society, will host the session and open the floor to audience questions.

30.09.2021

Not without us! – Pathways to a gender just transition

List of speakers:
– Ndivile Mokoena, Gender CC Southern Africa
– Dunja Krause, UNRISD
– Melissa Moreano, Critical Geography Collective,
Ecuador (facilitator)
– Representative from South Asia

Description:
This event will debate the interlinkages between gender justice and just transition. How do lived experiences differ for women when it comes to the impacts of the climate crises and how do they deal with it? How can the coping mechanism developed by women in different sectors influence the just transition debates? Are current just transition debates taking into account care work and gender segregation in the labour market? And what would a gender just transition look like?

Just Transition is not only about the transfer of the energy sector to a fossil-free power production, it’s a just transition to a new form of society. Based on examples from Latin and Northern America, Africa and Asia, we will
delve into a debate about what kinds of just transitions hold the potential to achieve a social-ecological transformation and why changing the value of different kinds of work and sectors might be necessary in order to achieve low-carbon sustainable development. The examples will be illustrated by short film clips of local
stories from different regions.

This session will advance the understanding of the potential of a gender just transition and how it could lead to a higher level policy change and climate justice.