01.10.2021

We Make Our Future

We Make Our Future is an interactive, educational and entertaining science show for the next generation of engineers.

 

Full-dome digital projections allow us to visit engineering marvels from history and explore the pros and cons of modern life. Learn how the Engineering Design Process can spark our imagination for sustainability solutions to the greatest challenges of our time.

01.10.2021

We Make Our Future

We Make Our Future is an interactive, educational and entertaining science show for the next generation of engineers.

 

Full-dome digital projections allow us to visit engineering marvels from history and explore the pros and cons of modern life. Learn how the Engineering Design Process can spark our imagination for sustainability solutions to the greatest challenges of our time.

01.10.2021

We Make Our Future

We Make Our Future is an interactive, educational and entertaining science show for the next generation of engineers.

 

Full-dome digital projections allow us to visit engineering marvels from history and explore the pros and cons of modern life. Learn how the Engineering Design Process can spark our imagination for sustainability solutions to the greatest challenges of our time.

01.10.2021

We Make Our Future

We Make Our Future is an interactive, educational and entertaining science show for the next generation of engineers.

 

Full-dome digital projections allow us to visit engineering marvels from history and explore the pros and cons of modern life. Learn how the Engineering Design Process can spark our imagination for sustainability solutions to the greatest challenges of our time.

01.10.2021

Films as agents for change: Be astounded by the full-dome film Climate Crimes and discuss with communication experts how best to inspire change

Getting the message across: How do we increase the effectiveness of climate
communications? How do we use film and video to engage audiences and inspire action? How do we motivate individuals, communities and broader society to make changes and take action to protect our planet?

If these questions are relevant to you please come and be a part of the discussion with our raft of communication and impact experts at the Planetarium, for film screenings and panel discussions.

EnviroFest International is running a series of dynamic events around climate
communications at the Planetarium featuring the award-winning, immersive, fulldome film Climate Crimes. This provocative film was created using climate data and statistics to bridge art and science as it seeks to uncover the complex relationship between global air pollution, climate change and human migration.

Using this extraordinary film as a launch pad, each showing will be followed by a panel discussion featuring experts in climate science, communications, community engagement, and impact campaigning as well as the film maker herself, Michaela French. We will discuss how we communicate the urgency and threat of climate change whilst empowering communities to engage with effective solutions, and consider how approaches may need to vary across different cultures and communities.

With so much expertise from around the world gathered at COP26, EnviroFest International seeks to involve attendees with diverse experiences in bridging climate issues and public understanding and engagement. We look forward to exploring these important issues so critical to effecting change, with an engaged and collaborative audience. Please join us for one of our events during COP26.

*Speaker line up will depend on allotted days *

01.10.2021

Films as agents for change: Be astounded by the full-dome film Climate Crimes and discuss with communication experts how best to inspire change

Getting the message across: How do we increase the effectiveness of climate
communications? How do we use film and video to engage audiences and inspire action? How do we motivate individuals, communities and broader society to make changes and take action to protect our planet?

If these questions are relevant to you please come and be a part of the discussion with our raft of communication and impact experts at the Planetarium, for film screenings and panel discussions.

EnviroFest International is running a series of dynamic events around climate
communications at the Planetarium featuring the award-winning, immersive, fulldome film Climate Crimes. This provocative film was created using climate data and statistics to bridge art and science as it seeks to uncover the complex relationship between global air pollution, climate change and human migration.

Using this extraordinary film as a launch pad, each showing will be followed by a panel discussion featuring experts in climate science, communications, community engagement, and impact campaigning as well as the film maker herself, Michaela French. We will discuss how we communicate the urgency and threat of climate change whilst empowering communities to engage with effective solutions, and consider how approaches may need to vary across different cultures and communities.

With so much expertise from around the world gathered at COP26, EnviroFest International seeks to involve attendees with diverse experiences in bridging climate issues and public understanding and engagement. We look forward to exploring these important issues so critical to effecting change, with an engaged and collaborative audience. Please join us for one of our events during COP26.

*Speaker line up will depend on allotted days *

01.10.2021

Films as agents for change: Be astounded by the full-dome film Climate Crimes and discuss with communication experts how best to inspire change

Getting the message across: How do we increase the effectiveness of climate
communications? How do we use film and video to engage audiences and inspire action? How do we motivate individuals, communities and broader society to make changes and take action to protect our planet?

If these questions are relevant to you please come and be a part of the discussion with our raft of communication and impact experts at the Planetarium, for film screenings and panel discussions.

EnviroFest International is running a series of dynamic events around climate
communications at the Planetarium featuring the award-winning, immersive, fulldome film Climate Crimes. This provocative film was created using climate data and statistics to bridge art and science as it seeks to uncover the complex relationship between global air pollution, climate change and human migration.

Using this extraordinary film as a launch pad, each showing will be followed by a panel discussion featuring experts in climate science, communications, community engagement, and impact campaigning as well as the film maker herself, Michaela French. We will discuss how we communicate the urgency and threat of climate change whilst empowering communities to engage with effective solutions, and consider how approaches may need to vary across different cultures and communities.

With so much expertise from around the world gathered at COP26, EnviroFest International seeks to involve attendees with diverse experiences in bridging climate issues and public understanding and engagement. We look forward to exploring these important issues so critical to effecting change, with an engaged and collaborative audience. Please join us for one of our events during COP26.

*Speaker line up will depend on allotted days *

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.

01.10.2021

Our Place in the Cosmos

“Our Place in the Cosmos” is a planetarium show about the special, fragile place of the Earth in our Galaxy, the only habitat we yet know able to sustain life.

Our home needs to be in the right place of our Galaxy to be safe from violent activity like supernovae. Yet we needed such activity in the past for the elements that support life, produced inside stars, to be seeded in the proto-solar nebula from which the Earth formed.

Our home also needs to be in the right place of the Solar System to be in its habitable zone, a place capable of sustaining liquid water its surface for eons. We compare Earth to our nearest planetary neighbours, Venus and Mars, which also began their lives in the habitable zone. Soon after their birth, over 4 billion years ago, these three planets looked similar – rocky worlds with flowing lava and water under an atmosphere.

Yet their subsequent evolution followed very different paths. Venus turned into a Hades, the oceans boiling away to create a thick, hot toxic atmosphere. Mars lost its atmosphere and the oceans evaporated into space, to leave a dead world, yet where evidence of past liquid flows is still apparent.

We illustrate these contrasts in the show, we delve beneath the atmospheres to show how oceans might have looked on Venus and Mars. We contrast them to the Earth, and we show what would happen to our continents should sea level rise.

Finally, we show Planet Earth today and see how we can monitor planetary health from space, providing a global view of the land, oceans and atmosphere. We see how fragile planet Earth is and the imperative to protect our home from further damage.