30.09.2021

Indigenous peoples of the Amazon and climate change: new solutions for energy from the indigenous territories

Classified as “clean energy”, large hydropower plants located in tropical forested regions may lead to significant carbon dioxide and methane. Running over human rights, profound impacts on biodiversity and traditional communities, violation of international laws and agreements and allegations of widespread corruption are some of the examples that have been observed about the construction of hydroelectric plants in the region. In addition to all these problems, Hydroelectric power plants installed in tropical forest areas emit considerable amounts of greenhouse gases as a result of the degradation of flooded vegetation and soil. With all these impacts on the scale, it is impossible to classify hydroelectric as clean energy. The Brazilian Indigenous people have denounced the impacts and risks in their areas, yet these same communities are often generating innovative, just, and scalable clean energy solutions.

This session is an invitation to hear from the front lines about the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydropower dams, that are being falsely portrayed as “clean and renewable” energy and a solution to the climate crisis. Indigenous leaders whose ancestral lands and lifeways are impacted by hydropower development in Brazil will tell their stories. Hear about how the Amazonian indigenous people are developing their own clean energy solutions contributing to the community development and at the same time tackling the needed energy transition. Hear how they are developing their own clean energy solutions contributing to the community development and at the same time tackling the needed energy transition.